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History of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism in Northern BC

This guide highlights archival resources related to the history of outdoor recreation and tourism across Northern and Central BC.

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Northern BC Archives & Special Collections
Contact:
Email: archives@unbc.ca

Hours of Service:
APPOINTMENT ONLY
Monday to Friday: 8:30 AM-4:30 PM
Closed Weekends & Statutory Holidays

Location: UNBC Prince George
Geoffrey R. Weller Library
4th Floor (Room 5-423)

BC Provincial Parks

The British Columbia Parks and Protected Areas System is a collection of physical properties managed by BC Parks. The system encompasses 1,035 parks, ecological reserves, and other properties covering an area of about 14.1 million hectares - about 14.4% of the entire province. It is the third largest park system in North America after national parks systems of Canada and the United States. The largest park unit is Tweedsmuir South Provincial Park at 989,616 hectares. (Wikipedia)

Provincial park systems and the Canadian national parks were key in the evolution of tourism in Canada. The official conserving of our natural spaces began around the same time as the railway boom, and in 1885 Banff was established as Canada’s first national park. By 1911, the Dominion Forest Reserves and Parks Act created the Dominion Parks Branch, the first of its kind in the world. The systemic conservation and celebration of Canada’s parks over the next century would help shape Canada’s identity, both at home and abroad. Through the 1930s, conservation officers and interpreters were hired to enhance visitor experiences. -- from Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality in BC by Morgan Westcott, editor

Check out all Northern BC Archives holdings related to provincial parks.

Mount Robson Provincial Park

Mount Robson Provincial Park is a provincial park in the Canadian Rockies with an area of 2,249 km². The park is located near the municipalities of Jasper and Valemount. The B.C. legislature created the park in 1913; it is the second oldest park in the provincial system. (Source) The park is the most visited provincial park in the BC Parks Central Interior region. (Source)

Related Archival Holdings at Other Institutions

Highlights from Northern BC Archives:

All Northern BC Archives database results relating to Mount Robson

2002.1.9.1.024 - Survey crew and horses at camp, Mt. Robson [photo above]

2017.6.2.74 - Interview with Marilyn Wheeler [oral history transcript]

2017.6.2.59 - Interview with Alice Sanregret [oral history transcript]

Highlights from UNBC Special Collections:

FC3845.R63 W44 2008 The Robson Valley story : a century of dreams / Marilyn J. Wheeler [book]

GV191.46.B8 W39 2004 Backcountry recreation resource management : a comparison of two trails in Mount Robson Provincial Park / by Paul A. Way. [thesis]

GV191.46.B7 B43 2003 Selected ecological impacts of outdoor recreation : the Berg Lake trail in Mount Robson Provincial Park / by Kularaj Bhandary. [project]

Tweedsmuir Provincial Park

Tweedsmuir South Provincial Park is a provincial park covering parts of the eastern Kitimat Ranges, northern Pacific Ranges, and the Rainbow Range in British Columbia. Nearest communities of size are Bella Coola and Anahim Lake. It was established on May 21, 1938 to protect a vast area of pristine wilderness in the western interior of the province. Due to the difficulty of operating Tweedsmuir Provincial Park as a single park unit, it was broken up into two operating units: Tweedsmuir North Provincial Park and Tweedsmuir South Provincial Park. (Wikipedia)

Related Archival Holdings at Other Institutions

Highlights from Northern BC Archives:

All Northern BC Archives database results relating to Tweedsmuir

2012.13.1.46.04 - Turner Lake - Glacier Mountain [photo above]

1996.7.5.898 - Provincial Park Pamphlet from Tweedsmuir Park North [pamphlet]

Highlights from UNBC Special Collections:

FC3845 .T9 1938 Tweedsmuir Park, British Columbia, Canada. [booklet]

FC3815.T84 H37 1999  Tweedsmuir south : British Columbia's park of many colours / Chris Harris. [book]

Wells Gray Provincial Park

Wells Gray Provincial Park is a large wilderness park located in east-central British Columbia, near Clearwater. The park protects most of the southern, and highest, regions of the Cariboo Mountains and covers 5,250 square kilometres. It is British Columbia's fourth largest park. The park was established in 1939. (Wikipedia)

Related Archival Holdings at Other Institutions

Highlights from the Archives:

All Northern BC Archives database results relating to Wells Gray Provincial Park

2012.13.1.74.02 - Wells Gray Park - Helmcken Falls [photo]

Highlights from Special Collections:

SK302 .R58 1957 Guide to moose hunting in Wells Gray Park / by R.W. Ritcey.[booklet]

FC541 .H64 A Wilderness Story of Fear and Courage / Henry Hogue [book] 

Ancient Forest/Chun T'oh Whudujut Provincial Park

Ancient Forest/Chun T'oh Whudujut Provincial Park and Protected Area is a provincial park and protected area located in the regional district of Fraser-Fort George in British Columbia. The park was established on 19 May 2016 to protect a portion of the North American inland temperate rainforest, the only inland temperate rainforest in the world. (Wikipedia)

 

Highlights from the Archives:

All Northern BC Archives database results relating to the Ancient Forest

2016.5.3.15 "The Ancient Forest: A Walk through British Columbia's Hidden Treasure" [pamphlet]

1994.1.1.5.2.412 Ancient Forest trail [video]

1994.1.1.5.2.433 Class in the Ancient Forest [video]

Highlights from Special Collections:

HC118.M395 H35 2013 Assessing the economic benefits of ancient forest trail ecotourism in McBride, British Columbia / by John Hall. [thesis]

PS8627 .O94 2008 Once... in the Ancient Forest / By Nowell Senior. [booklet]